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Stakeholders

The key stakeholder benefit is that the Charter principles offer a set of standards that can be applied across the board to assist them in their responsibilities for caring for children.


 Parents and carers
The Charter principles will ensure that their children receive the best possible care in a safe, accessible environment that is also free from stigma, enabling every child to achieve their full potential.

 Primary and early years’ settings
Interventions based on the full set of principles will ensure that the 20% of pupils in need of help will receive appropriate therapeutic support that will enhance their ability to learn and interact in a positive way with teachers and other children 

 Social services
Support for the children with psychological issues will be provided in a safe, convenient, reliable environment in which data sharing, clinical and social objectives are carefully monitored in the interests of the child 

 Primary health care
The specialised interventions required for children’s mental health may be offered with confidence, relieving pressures on surgeries, staff and budgets.

 Voluntary organisations
Adhering to the principles of the Charter will enhance the credibility of the organisation.

Professional organisations
Adhering to the principles of the Charter will enhance their registrants’ credibility for obtaining employment and funding. 

 National and Local Government
The Charter provides a blueprint for policy-makers preparing the new Mental Health legislation. Its principles encourage close Departmental co-ordination and a continuous measurement of outcomes. Commissioning using practice based evidence will achieve better value for money. 

The Charter principles can be applied immediately by local government to improve the safety and effectiveness of practice for all who work therapeutically with children   The risk occasioned by unqualified, unregistered persons working with children in the absence of adequate clinical supervision and deploying unproven interventions  will be substantially reduced.

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